Color: Kees Goudzwaard

July 9, 2015 § Leave a comment

Oil paintings of collages of tape, acetate, and colored paper by Dutch artist Kees Goudzwaard

More on Goudzwaard and his method here

  
  
  
  
  
  

Color: Office for Creative Research

June 17, 2015 § Leave a comment

 
OCR Journal #001 Each journal has a unique data-generated cover. 

Sold out, alas. 

From the Office for Creative Research

  

 

Color: Federal Colors

June 8, 2015 § Leave a comment

There are 650 official Federal Standard Colors.  Federal Standard Color Chart. Can you tell them apart? Via Hyperallergic.

 

Color: Richard Baker’s Studio

October 8, 2013 § Leave a comment

Color studies of book covers in the painter Richard Baker’s studio.

Baker-side-wall

 

Via Hyperallergic‘s very nice article by John Yau, “Richard Baker: Physiognomist of Our Past and Future.”

Richard Baker shows regularly at Clark Gallery in New York and Albert Merola Gallery in Provincetown.

 

Richard-Baker-Studio-Wall

Color: Cy Twombly

July 6, 2011 § Leave a comment

“Untitled” from 2005.

“In the only written statement Mr. Twombly ever made about his work, a short essay in an Italian art journal in 1957, he tried to make clear that his intentions were not subversive but elementally human. Each line he made, he said, was “the actual experience” of making the line, adding: “It does not illustrate. It is the sensation of its own realization.” Years later, he described this more plainly. “It’s more like I’m having an experience than making a picture,” he said.” [“American Artist Scribbles a Unique Path” by Randy Kennedy, in the New York Times]

Also: David Sylvester interviews Cy Twombly in 2000.

Books: This is Not Writing

June 13, 2011 § Leave a comment

Julian Dashper
This is not writing    2011
Publication
ISBN: 978-0-9582981-9-3
Text by Julian Dashper
Published by Clouds and Michael Lett, 2011
Hardcover, cloth-bound
188 pages
Text-only
English
Edition: 1000
Overall size: 166 x 236 x 23mm

Thank you Minus Space.

More on Burroughs’ Color Walks from Michael Taussig

May 25, 2011 § 1 Comment

Michael Taussig on Burroughs’ color walks:

“That was in 1964. Brion Gysin was his painter pal in those days and when you look over Gysin’s work, playing with color in relation to written words, let alone Burroughs’s own color work, as in the 1960s scrapbooks and the 1980s paintings, it suddenly hits you that there is a tight connection between the mad desire to cut out, on the one hand, and this fascination with color, on the other.

As when, in his homage to Gysin, Burroughs invokes the idea of going on “color walks”—which are a good deal more than color-coded walkways through Tangier or New York or Paris: red on Wednesdays, blue on Fridays, or whatever. A delightful idea, to be sure. But that is only the beginning because the idea here is that the very notion of a code is to be cut out, meaning that color is invoked so as to loosen the restraint of coding and that there is something about color that facilitates this, as if colors love to betray themselves like yellow means gold, awesome and holy, but also treason and cowardice, and it has a long history in the Christian West of marking adulterous women, Jews, Muslims, prostitutes, heretics, witches, and executioners.

Could we not say, therefore, that with the color walk we are alerted to the singular and beautiful fact that color itself walks?

This would make color even more of a flâneur than Burroughs,who liked to call himself el hombre invisible in his walks through the market in Tangier in the late 1950s. What was invisible in Tangier became color in Paris, thanks to Gysin’s paintings painted in Tangier. Maybe people have to lose themselves first and become invisible as long-term residents in a third world country before being readied for the color walk? But then Burroughs was continuously marginal in utterly realistic as well as in utterly romantic ways. He was queer. He was a heroin addict. He loathed America. And he had weird ideas about most everything, especially writing. Being marginal can mean you switch on and you switch off because you are either too conspicuous or invisible. Too invisible, that’s the point, at which point you emerge as color, walking color at that.

And, remember, the original insight for the color walk lay in Gysin’s playing with letters, letters that form words. Here color and the decomposition of written language signs go hand in hand. What also happens when Smoker comes in from the cold is that the old writer in the boxcar by the junkyard is once again able to write. As colors pour from tar, he unblocks. He pours. The cat purrs. And guess what? All his stories are animal stories. (“Of course,” adds Burroughs.) The old writer finds them in an illustrated book. There is the Flying Fox with his long black fingers and sad black face, just like Smoker. There is a Fishing Bat peering from under its shell. There is the Black Lemur with round red eyes and its little red tongue, the beautiful Ring-Tailed Lemur hopping through the forest as if on a pogo stick. “So many creatures, and he loves them all” (WL, p. 248).

The old writer caresses these pictures.

After all, “I have been a cut up for years,” the writer told us. “I think of

words as being alive like animals. They don’t like to be kept in pages. Cut the pages and let the words out.” Now the words and the animals become united in the stories the old writer found welling up inside himself as colors pour from tar.”

Michael Taussig, What Color is the Sacred

See also Taussig’s “Getting High with Burroughs and Benjamin” in Cabinet Magazine.

Image: Bryon Gysin Dream Machine iPhone app created by the New Museum as part of their Brion Gysin Dream Machine show this past spring.

More here: Color: William Burroughs Walking on Color

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