Sounds: Ordinarily Unheard

July 7, 2015 § Leave a comment

 
Ordinarily Unheard: An Evening of Performed Sound

Thursday, July 16, 7-9pm
Calico Gallery, 67 West St. #203, Brooklyn, NY 11222
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Sal Randolph, David B. Smith, and Audra Wolowiec will each present a performed sound work integral to their broader practices, which include visual, textual, and sculptural projects dealing with themes such as language, imagination, and memory.

Sal Randolph Airport Scores for Drift

These Airport Scores are part of an experimental novel, Drift, being written on Twitter and other social media, with elements distributed in real space and on the web. They are “ambience scores,” transcriptions into language of the ordinarily unheard sounds of place; from this alphabetically rendered sound composition, places may then be performed in voice or imagination.
David B. Smith Forgetting Your Name (extended version)

Smith will lead a participatory ceremony where members of the audience are invited to speak a name of their choice as raw material for an electronic sound composition. The composition will unfold organically and unexpectedly and will waver between found sound and music, and between evolution and deterioration. The words the audience speaks will, like memories, fade in and out of legibility, repeating and building, yet obscuring and changing original meanings and intentions.
Audra Wolowiec  (         )

(         ) is a language based short film with two slide projectors and sound components. Held by punctuation, signals from two lighthouses begin to flash across the screen, communicating through fragments. As the sound of breaths continue to locate each other, waves allude that geometry is of no use to calculate a proximity that is felt. This work was first performed at the Poetry Project at St. Marks Church, Jan 2015.

Text: Ostrich Egg Book

June 14, 2015 § Leave a comment

More from Erik Kwakkel, a book written on an ostrich egg.

  

The shell is covered with quotations from the Koran and poetry: ‘It describes the soul’s journey from death to life,’ says historian Dionisius Agius, of the University of Leeds, who is analysing the text.” 

Dionisius Agious also says: “Writing on an egg may be attributed magical significance; there is an old belief that the egg gives miraculous power to the dead and can call them back to life.



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